(Updated 17 April) Please read below for how to join the online meeting. Meeting codes are now available.

A pre-application has been made to Rother District Council in relation to building 22 new homes on land at Glebe House. This site is just outside the village development boundary on the south side of the A265, after Rectory Close, travelling towards Etchingham. 

 Rother District Council suggested the developer contact the Parish Council regarding the inclusion of the site as a housing allocation in the Neighbourhood Plan. This site was previously considered and rejected by Rother District Council in the 2013 SHLAA (Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment).  

 The site was put forward in the Neighbourhood Plan call for sites in 2018 but no one representing the site attended the assessment meeting. That process has been completed.  

 The Parish Council have now received ‘concept’ drawings and an indicative layout. These are being made available to the public at this early stage. Click on the links below to view these documents. Update (17/4) presentation for Tuesday evening added below.

Glebe House Neighbourhood Plan Submission

Glebe House Site Plan 1

Glebe House Site Plan 2

Glebe House Site Plan 3

Glebe House Burwash 21.4.20 presentation

 The Parish Council has the opportunity to formally assess the site and will evaluate it on merit. 

 Due to the coronavirus the Parish Council is not meeting in person but by virtual meetings. The developer has agreed to attend an online meeting where there will be a presentation to committee of the plans and we can find out more about their ideas. This online meeting will take place on Tuesday 21st April at 6.30pm. The Agenda can be viewed here The pdf of the powerpoint presentation to be used on Tuesday evening can be viewed here or by clicking on the document links above. 

How to join the online meeting:

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/99103966982

 Meeting ID: 991 0396 6982

Meeting Etiquette

When you access the meeting you will automatically be muted.

Please can you remain muted to avoid background noise unless you need to say something at the allocated time. After the presentation of the Glebe House site proposed plans there will be opportunity for you to ask questions/ make comments. If you would like to speak at the allocated time we ask that you show your hand and wait for the Chair to acknowledge you before speaking. We ask that throughout the presentation everyone remain silent and muted to facilitate an efficient online meeting.

The meeting will be opened at 6.15pm to allow everyone to log on and then we shall begin at 6.30pm. Please make sure you are logged on and ready for 6.30pm so there are no delays.

The meeting will be used for fact finding with opportunity after the presentation for both councillors and public to ask questions. The intention is to organise a fully fledged consultation after lockdown when meetings have returned to normal.

 If you have questions, comments or areas you wish to have explored please let us know. Please contact the Chair of the Planning Committee, Cllr Nick Moore at the following email address: cllr.nick.moore@burwashpc.org.uk 

 We will keep you updated each time we receive more news.

 

  

Comments (3)

  • Gavin & Claire Roweth Brambles Rectory Close Burwash TN19 7BH

    Dear Burwash Parish Councillors

    As residents of Brambles, the property immediately adjacent to the site, we would like to comment on the proposal and strongly object to any development by George Arthur in the field and its inclusion in the housing allocation for the village.

    We find it incredible that he could conceive of destroying such a beautiful part of Burwash.

    Recorded throughout the Burwash Neighbourhood Development Plan, in many of its aspects, this land is totally unacceptable for development. Even in an AONB this land is special, with stunning traditional Wealden views in all directions.

    As we all know, Burwash is historically a ridge top village dating back to medieval times and beyond. Seen from many miles to the north and south, this field and the ridge at its southern edge, clearly indicate the village’s eastern boundary. What many residents may not know is that 12 years ago this was reinforced by Rother Council when tree preservation orders were placed on dozens of the trees at Brambles in order to ‘To protect the village from further development Eastwards’ (their words!).

    The proposal says this development would not adversely affect the landscape, this is rubbish, it would for all time be seen for many miles north and south, especially during the 5 months of the year when there are no leaves on the trees and the 20 or 30 years it will take these new trees to grow to the necessary size.

    The submission suggests the housing would not be ribbon development, however as it would join Burwash to The Glebe it could therefore be a green light to further infilling along the A265 to the Care Home nearly half a mile out of the village. This is classic ribbon development, whatever the document claims. The Glebe house maybe 200 metres from the field, but the various cottages and coach house on Glebe land are only 100 meters, so clearly the proposal is attempting to deceive its audience.

    The A265, as we all know, is a busy road, especially during rush hour and school times. The number of heavy goods vehicles using it has grown significantly over the past few years. There is no footpath on the south of the road where the proposed entrance will be and only a steep grass bank opposite on the north before the path 10 metres further west. There is only 75 metres to the blind bend where traffic exits the village, lorries will be rounding the corner to see pedestrians in the road, and motorists sometimes use the short strip of road running down to The Glebe’s entrance to overtake other vehicles, a risky passing at any time, but with children, pushchairs, dogs etc, struggling to cross the road here, this is a nightmare waiting to happen, anyone can see the irresponsibility of this idea.

    We could go on and on with many objections, like the wildlife that uses the field, Kingfishers and ducks move from our pond to pond in the field, as do all three British species of newt, the owls, kestrels and bats that feed here, but maybe it’s best to refer to the Burwash Neighbourhood Development Plan and to a letter by Robert Banks of Burwash: Save Our Fields which is far more detailed and technical in its objection to why this land should be rejected for inclusion in the Neighbourhood Plan housing allocation.

    Gavin and Claire Roweth
    Brambles
    Rectory Close

  • S. G.

    I live close to this proposed development and I feel that this plan is an excellent idea.
    To remain a vibrant and youthful community, affordable houses need to be built so that the young families of Burwash can get a foot on the property ladder whilst remaining within their own community.

    It is laudable of Mr. George Arthur to offer his land for this purpose. The site is low impact, the planned houses will be invisible to the great majority of residents and visitors to this lovely village.

    The view from the footpath will not be spoiled to any great degree. I live close to the field in question and often walk that way. The view to the south is beautiful, but less so to the north as it is already partially blocked by trees and overlooks the road.
    I do not feel that the planned development would lessen my enjoyment of that landscape.
    The integrity of the landscape is maintained within the plans. The houses seem designed to respect the contours of the existing field and preserve natural features such as the pond.
    It appears to be both a sympathetic and thoughtful development that will nestle in a natural hollow and be visible to very few.

    Furthermore, the health of the village as a whole should not be endangered by the desire of a few to enjoy a privileged view that will not be shared. I am fortunate enough to live in this lovely area. It would seem hypocritical of me to deny that to others.

    This new development could also be used as a spur to sort out the traffic problems on that part of the road. Vehicles rush through those bends and into the village, there are far more accidents than there should be.
    I would like to point to Etchingham as an example of how a new development can go hand in hand with with traffic calming measures, enhancing the lives of the whole community.

    With regard to the chalcolithic axe head, this artefact is unprovenanced and without archaeological context. (now held, but not displayed by the British museum)
    Its original location is unknown, and the map reference usually given for it is in the vicinity of Batemans, not The Glebe.
    One questionable find many decades ago should not be used as a bar to prevent the young families of Burwash from remaining within their community.

    Without affordable housing Burwash is in danger of becoming like a fly in amber. Perfectly preserved, but no longer a living, growing entity.

    This development gives a chance to the future of Burwash, and I hope that the village supports Mr Arthur’s plans.
    As someone who lives very close to the proposed site, I would like to give it my full support and approval.

    I would not usually comment on matters such as these. I am only doing so because of a anonymous sign that appeared on the footpath informing me (in highly prejudicial language) of the development and asking for my comment.

    I have been told that the field where the sign stands belongs to the church. If so, is the sign a official church notice? Are the sentiments expressed on the sign the official position of the church or other relevant landowner? Was permission given for the sign to be erected?

    Thank you for your time, and for giving me the opportunity to share my views.

  • A local resident

    I live close to this proposed development and I feel that this plan is an excellent idea.
    To remain a vibrant and youthful community, affordable houses need to be built so that the young families of Burwash can get a foot on the property ladder whilst remaining within their own community.

    It is laudable of Mr. George Arthur to offer his land for this purpose. The site is low impact, the planned houses will be invisible to the great majority of residents and visitors to this lovely village.

    The view from the footpath will not be spoiled to any great degree. I live close to the field in question and often walk that way. The view to the south is beautiful, but less so to the north as it is already partially blocked by trees and overlooks the road.
    I do not feel that the planned development would lessen my enjoyment of that landscape.
    The integrity of the landscape is maintained within the plans. The houses seem designed to respect the contours of the existing field and preserve natural features such as the pond.
    It appears to be both a sympathetic and thoughtful development that will nestle in a natural hollow and be visible to very few.

    Furthermore, the health of the village as a whole should not be endangered by the desire of a few to enjoy a privileged view that will not be shared. I am fortunate enough to live in this lovely area. It would seem hypocritical of me to deny that to others.

    This new development could also be used as a spur to sort out the traffic problems on that part of the road. Vehicles rush through those bends and into the village, there are far more accidents than there should be.
    I would like to point to Etchingham as an example of how a new development can go hand in hand with with traffic calming measures, enhancing the lives of the whole community.

    With regard to the chalcolithic axe head, this artefact is unprovenanced and without archaeological context. (now held, but not displayed by the British museum)
    Its original location is unknown, and the map reference usually given for it is in the vicinity of Batemans, not The Glebe.
    One questionable find many decades ago should not be used as a bar to prevent the young families of Burwash from remaining within their community.

    Without affordable housing Burwash is in danger of becoming like a fly in amber. Perfectly preserved, but no longer a living, growing entity.

    This development gives a chance to the future of Burwash, and I hope that the village supports Mr Arthur’s plans.
    As someone who lives very close to the proposed site, I would like to give it my full support and approval.

    I would not usually comment on matters such as these. I am only doing so because of a anonymous sign that appeared on the footpath informing me (in highly prejudicial language) of the development and asking for my comment.

    I have been told that the field where the sign stands belongs to the church. If so, is the sign a official church notice? Are the sentiments expressed on the sign the official position of the church or other relevant landowner? Was permission given for the sign to be erected?

    Thank you for your time, and for giving me the opportunity to share my views.

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